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Prix de Lausanne 2013 February 9, 2013

Filed under: Uncategorized — catkat11 @ 12:48 am

Did anyone get a chance to follow the prix de lausanne finals online, or is able to watch it on youtube? I live in Germany and unfortunately there seem to be copyright issues and I can’t watch the finals on youtube. However I found it very interesting to watch the vlogs and follow the contestants throughout the contest.

The prix de lausanne channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/PrixdeLausanne

Any thoughts and/or opinions on this years competition?

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12 Responses to “Prix de Lausanne 2013”

  1. sophieyounger Says:

    Here is a link to a specially edited version of this year’s Finals, for use in Germany, Japan and Canada: http://youtu.be/SSfZXe-Up-o I hope it works for you! Yes I watched each day of coverage (6 days) from Lausanne this year, and for the last 4 years too.

  2. atlanticw Says:

    I’m sorry you can’t see the prix. I wonder why it is blocked? I watched a bit of the final on youtube. One thing I noticed was that several of the girls all picked the Swanhilda variation. Nothing against the variation, but it seemed that almost every girl did it. Are they restricted to a certain few classical variations?

    One thing that also struck me was that only one girl actually placed. The rest were all men. I am not sure how this usually plays out. Is this normal? It seemed a little odd.

  3. Cat Says:

    There’s a music copyright restriction, but in the meantime the prix uploaded a version that I was able to watch. I think they are restricted, but there’s quite a long list to choose from. (Raymonda, Kitri, Gamzatti, to name a few!) And actually I think last year they even added a few more variations to choose from, I remember seeing a few variations from Paquita as well. Maybe because the 2011 winner Mayara Magri danced Swanilda and it led to her success? No idea….

    Yes, and I was rather surprised that Miko Fogarty ‘only’ got the prize as best Swiss candidate. She was one of the featured girls in ‘First position’ and already has numerous international prizes under her. And while I do not agree with the whole ‘training for competitions’, I do think she is a lovely dancer with potential. We’ll have to wait and see what happens.

    The way the prizes are divided up is very different, sometimes it’s more girls, sometimes it’s quite even, and in this case, it was a year for the boys. What I also find interesting is if the winner also got the audience vote prize (Which has been the case in 2010, 2011, and 2013)

    Leticia Domingues (the only girl that placed) is from the same school as 2011 winner Mayara Magri. They must be doing something right – Mayara got a job in the Royal Ballet. We’ll also wait and see which path Leticia chooses.

    • sophieyounger Says:

      Here is a link to a specially edited version of this year’s Finals, for use in Germany, Japan and Canada: http://youtu.be/SSfZXe-Up-o I hope it works for you! Yes I watched each day of coverage (6 days) from Lausanne this year, and for the last 4 years too.

    • 15 Says:

      I do not think Miko Fogarty is that great of a dancer (granted, I am only a ballet mom who hasn’t dance a day in her life, yet loves ballet for its artistry). When I watch videos of international kids at the Bolshoi Ballet Academy, I am truly impressed! Those kids are truly great dancers–beauty in all its glory!

  4. atlanticw Says:

    One factor is that the age range is 15-18. Those few years (even just one year) can make a big difference. Are finalists allowed to enter again?

    • sophieyounger Says:

      On the whole the age range difference issue isn’t relevant at the Prix de Lausanne, because unlike some competitions, at Lausanne they’re more interested in identifying POTENTIAL over the course of a week of classes, rather than technical supremacy in a particular performance of a variation. As a result, they will award scholarships not on the basis of the final performance only or on technical ability only (where clearly the 18yr olds often ARE more able than the 15yr olds, though not always) but rather on POTENTIAL: technical, artistic and musical. Hope this helps!

  5. Jennifer Says:

    I don’t really like how Fogarty seems to dance for competitions, it stunts artistic growth not to mention limits the student to only work a certain way. I didn’t know she is Swiss I thought she lives in California.

    I’ve noticed one thing from watching PdL over the years, that is that Japanese dancers love Coppelia variation. Second, the South American girls are good turners but not so good on plastique. Americans are all around more athletic than other girls, and the Chinese girls for some reason always seem to have small flaws in technique or trouble holding turnout.

    Do Russian girls enter PdL anymore or do they all go to Moscow competition now?

  6. atlanticw Says:

    Maria Kotchtekova won the Pd in 2002L, but I haven’t seen many Russians in the competition. I assume the Mariisnky and Bolshoi do not take PdL scholars, so if they wish to remain in Russia, it would probably make the most sense to compete in Moscow.

    I agree that the ‘competition effect’ has reduced artistic quality. I think that there is a tendency to show off when you only have two and half minutes to make an impression.

    I was also wondering about the “swiss” prize. I am assuming she must have citizenship through a parent?

    • sophieyounger Says:

      Yes, Miko’s father is Swiss.

      And as for Miko not placing, which seemed to surprise a lot of Americans, particularly those who hadn’t watched the week of classes, in fact I think it was probably good for both Miko and for her American fans (most of whom she picked up as a result of featuring on First Position) to see that there is a bigger world out there, and that North America is not after all the centre of the world, in dance terms or otherwise. There is VERY much that is interesting, going on in schools all over the world.

      I definitely agree with you re the questionable value of most competitions. But in relation to what you wrote re “I think that there is a tendency to show off when you only have two and half minutes to make an impression” – this actually doesn’t apply to the Prix de Lausanne for the reasons I wrote about above, ie:

      At Lausanne they’re more interested in identifying POTENTIAL over the course of WEEK of classes, rather than deciding the outcome of the scholarship awards based on technical supremacy in a particular 2 minute performance of a particular variation. As a result, they will award scholarships not on the basis of the final performance only or on technical ability only, but rather on POTENTIAL as observed by the extremely experienced jury, in relation to their dancing over the entire week and with reference to their dancing in technical, artistic and musical terms.

      Hope this sheds a bit of light on the ethos behind the Prix de Lausanne, which is a very different competition to most others!

  7. catkat11 Says:

    I definitely agree on the fact that in some matter, americans are maybe not as aware on what is really going on in the rest of the world. I’ve seen this in particular in some instrumental competitions, where very few (if any) americans are able to place in finals, the competitions is extremely cutthroat here. (However by no means am I saying that the competition is no less cutthroat elsewhere!)
    I am not a big supporter of competitions, certainly not ones that require young dancers to perform adult variations. (Like the YAGP) I think the way the PDL is judged throughout a week, where the judges also follow the classes and development and potential and learning abilities of the candidates is very important. But one way or another, a competition is a competition, and in some years it’s been very noticeable that the competition aspect removes a lot of the artistry. I also find it interesting to see who gets the audience prize. (All the more interesting when the audience prize goes to the gold medalist!) However, in the recent years I’ve noticed a change in where the winners go and how their careers develop. (Although many of these winners are of course very very young, and it might simply be too soon to tell) but I find a lot of earlier winners such as Alina Cojocaru, Darcey Bussell, Diana Vishneva etc went on to have extremely successful careers as soloists. I haven’t yet seen the winners of the past 6-7 years achieve the same kind of career. (If I’m wrong please forgive me, I’m perhaps not so up-to-date! I do know the Lili Felmery -though not a gold winnner- is currently a first soloist with the Hungarian National Ballet, it’s really a pity she’s not in the same kind of limelight as others, I think she’s a really lovely dancer!)
    Long story(post) short: I think a competition, and in particular preparing for a competition is a valuable learning experience, however I think that in the recent years it’s a pity that there are quite a few competitions that seem to focus on ‘wunderkinder’ and promote technique rather than budding artistry.

  8. atlantic Says:

    I agree that the PDL is a superior competition than others and is certainly a better format. I agree that I find it interesting that many of the recent winners haven not really gone on to much success. Like you said, they may need time to develop their careers, but 6-7 years is a long time for a dancer.


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